Celebrating With Your Graduate


Mark this exciting time with a party or another celebration for your child.

By FamilyTime

 

Now is the time of year to plan graduation celebrations. You may think a party is a wonderful way to honor this major achievement, but before you make arrangements, listen to your child's ideas.

Getting Started
If you and your child decide on a party, begin by setting a budget. Choose the location and make a guest list with your child. Buy invitations and plan the menu. 

Types of Parties
The party may be small--just family and close friends--or large. Because graduations are nearly always in the spring, you may want to have it outdoors. If the party is going to be large, consider hiring a caterer. If small, you, your child and other family members can cook the food, but it's still helpful to buy some already prepared and make the rest.

Outdoors: (You may need a rain date or alternative site)
Barbecue / Picnic
Pool party Clam bake, with sports
Boat party

Indoors:
At home
Restaurant
Catering Hall
Bowling Party

Entertainment
Music is an important part of any party, and particularly when most of the guests are teenagers or young adults. Choose music that everyone will enjoy and have enough selections so that you can rotate them. Dancing is always fun for all ages.

Plan some activities appropriate for young people, friends and family members. Make sure you and the graduate participate in the party. Ask someone else for help in the kitchen.

Special Gifts
Rather than asking for individual gifts, plan a special one from the entire family. Well ahead of time, ask family members to contribute poems, photos or special wishes for a scrapbook.

Another idea for a scrapbook is a collection of photos and other mementos of your child's school years. Include notes from a few favorite teachers and friends.

In Lieu of Party
If your child does not want a party, plan a trip someplace meaningful. This does not have to be far away. Even a day or weekend trip will be memorable and will provide your family opportunity to bond with the child who is moving on to a new phase of life.