When You Are a Soccer Mom


Know the rules of the game -- and root for your team!

By FamilyTime

 Whether your child is a superstar or a rank beginner on the soccer field, as a parent you are spending a lot of time standing on the sidelines. Make the most of those hours to insure your youngster has a great time.

Parents from coast to coast enroll their kids in soccer programs. It’s a terrific sport for children. Size and strength are not prerequisites for success. Teamwork is crucial, which perhaps is the most important life lesson a young athlete can learn.

Understand the Game

It’s so easy to scream, yell, and cheer for your son or daughter on the field. It’s far more effective to cheer for them when you understand what is going on.

Cheering for a player who is out of bounds or off sides doesn’t do anyone any favors. Buy a book, talk to an experienced soccer player, or pay attention at practice to learn the ins and outs of the game.

Too often a sketchy understanding of the game’s rules leads to misunderstandings between parents and coaches and parents and referees.

The Cheering Section
When you assume your role as a soccer mom (or dad), keep in mind the “parent’s code” as outlined by the Massachusetts Youth Soccer Association:
  • Make sure your child is in good health, properly equipped, and on time.
  • Foster a spirit of cooperation between parents and coaches.
  • Accept the referee’s decisions with grace. They are in charge of the game.
  • Remind your child to be honest and gracious, whether the team wins or loses.
  • Conduct yourself with honor and dignity.
Some towns have instituted what is called Silent Sunday. This means that no one can cheer or yell from the sidelines. The kids play their hearts out and the moms and dads stand by quietly.

Many children’s sports experts applaud this approach. After all, they explain, playing youth soccer is supposed to be fun for the kids.

Your town may not adopt such a strict policy, but everyone will benefit if the adults standing along the edge of the field are respectful – and sometimes loudly encouraging -- fans.