Calendar Recipe Box Shopping List Address Book
      
 
 

The Holiday Roast

The Holiday Roast


Understanding the fundamentals of roasting results in juicy, perfectly cooked meat.


By FamilyTime

  Print: Full Page
Text Only
  Email: Article
   Find: More Articles


Christmas dinner is one of the triumphs of the holiday season, and yet nothing ruins the meal more than a dry, tasteless roast. With a few basic techniques, this need never happen.

Choose the best meat you can afford -- preferably beef, pork or lamb cut from the rib, loin, sirloin or hindquarters. Once you decide on the cut and weight of the meat, decide on the roasting temperature.

High-Temperature Roasting
This means roasting at temperatures higher than 400°F. The high temperature produces a crispy crust and rare-to-medium interior meat with plenty of moisture. It is best for small cuts (3 to 4 pounds) of high-quality meat.

Moderate-Temperature Roasting
Over the years, home cooks have roasted meat at 325° to 350°F with good success. This is the best temperature for large beef roasts, pork shoulders and meaty legs of lamb - and you will find most standard recipes call for these temperatures.

Low-Temperature Roasting
If you are fortunate enough to buy a tender, well-marbled, moderate-sized cut of meat (8 to 9 pounds), try this method. Begin by turning the oven up to 450°F to sear the meat. After 10 minutes, reduce the oven temperature to 250° to 275°F. This produces tender, moist meat with minimal shrinkage.

Determining Doneness
Cookbooks provide the number of minutes per pound for roasting meat. Use these guidelines when scheduling the meal, but rely on an instant-read thermometer to determine when the meat is actually done.

Insert the thermometer into the thickest part of the meat. When it registers within 15 degrees of doneness, monitor the meat every five or 10 minutes.

Beef--140°F. for medium; 155° to 160° for medium-well
Pork--155° - 160°F.
Lamb--140°F. for medium; 155° to 160° for medium-well

Let roasts stand for 15 to 25 minutes before carving. This allows the juices to collect. The temperature continues to rise during this time, too.

Roasting Pans
A good roasting pan is one that is the right size. The sides should not be higher than the meat. The pan should hold the meat without crowding, but if it's too big, the meat juices will burn.

A roasting rack can be a flat grid or "V" shaped. If you don't have one, prop the meat up on some vegetables - celery or carrots work well - which add flavor during cooking.



Enter your email address to receive delicious, family-friendly recipes, exciting promotions, helpful articles and more delivered right to your mailbox. What could be better?





HyperLink


The Holiday Front Door
Welcome friends and loved ones with a festive front door!
View Full Article

Outside for the Holidays
Take your decorating abilities out of doors for an especially festive season.
View Full Article

Houseguests for the Holidays
Open your home and your heart to dear friends and relatives.
View Full Article

Bringing Home Your Holiday Kitten
Be prepared to welcome your new holiday kitten home.
View Full Article

A Holiday Breakfast
Breakfast is always a welcome meal when the family has time to gather -- and at no time is this a better idea than during the winter holidays.
View Full Article





Classic Standing Beef Rib Roast
A standing rib roast is a very special treat and traditional holiday fare. This one is served with a thin gravy called "jus." Don't overcook the meat!



Beef Roast 'n' Onion Gravy
In this recipe, some of the Swanson® Beef Broth with Onion is used as a basting sauce for the eye round roast to keep it moist and flavorful, and the rest is used to make the savory onion-studded pan gravy.



Roast Beef with Gravy
Heres how beef broth makes pan gravy better--stir a little flour and a can of Swanson® Beef Broth into the roasting pan and cook up homemade gravy.



Lean Cuisine Roasted Beef and Potatoes Stroganoff
For a quick and healthy stroganoff-style meal, stir in lowfat or fat free sour cream before serving.



Lean Cuisine Roasted Beef and Potatoes with Herbs and Wine
Looking for an extra splash of flavor? Try stirring in thyme or parsley and a splash of red wine. Add a tall, cool glass of Nestea and relax.


 
Tagged With: roast beef, splurge, welcoming aroma, holiday fare
  








 
Simply fill out the required fields to begin enjoying the benefits of FamilyTime.com – it’s fast and it’s free.
* required



 
 
Concerned about privacy? Rest assured, we never sell or share your personal information.
See our Privacy Policy.
//